Crackdown begins on illegal immigrants in Saudi Arabia

Viewed by: 55
Crackdown begins on illegal immigrants in Saudi Arabia Foreign workers outside the Saudi immigration department waiting for an exit visa.
2:58 AM
6
November
2013

Riyadh

 

Saudi authorities rounded up thousands of illegal foreign workers at the start of a nationwide crackdown ultimately aimed at creating more jobs for locals, media reported yesterday.

Hundreds of thousands of workers have already left the kingdom following a grace period of seven months during which authorities told expatriates that if they did not fix their legal status they had to leave the country or face jail.

The government hopes that reducing the number of illegal workers will create opportunities for Saudi job-seekers. The official Saudi unemployment rate is 12%.

“Since early (Monday) morning, the security campaign got off to a vigorous start as inspectors swung into action,” Nawaf al-Bouq, a police spokesman, told Saudi Gazette newspaper.

Police carried out raids on businesses, markets and residential areas to catch expatriates whose visas are invalid because they are not working for the company that “sponsored” their entry into the kingdom.

For a second day yesterday parts of the capital Riyadh were unusually empty as many expatriates stayed at home to avoid potential arrest.

Raising private sector employment in a country where most Saudis are in government jobs and where businesses employ more foreigners than locals is a major challenge for the kingdom.

Bouq told the paper that at least 1,899 illegal workers had been arrested in the Red Sea port city of Jeddah.

The paper also said police had arrested at least 2,200 people in the southwestern city of Samta, 379 in the Eastern Province and hundreds of others in other cities.

In Jeddah, dozens of Indonesian workers, mostly women, staged a sit-in to pressure the authorities to hasten their deportation, according to Arab News newspaper.

Many workers cannot leave the country because they lack official papers, including passports, the paper said.

The remittances sent home by expatriates in Saudi Arabia are often vital for their own nations, which include Yemen, Ethiopia, the Philippines, Indonesia, India, Pakistan and Egypt.

For decades, Saudi authorities ignored irregularities such as working for firms that had not sponsored their visas or in trades other than those listed on their immigration documents.

That spurred a black market in which foreigners overstayed visas, set up illegal businesses or took low-paid jobs in areas where authorities wanted Saudi workers hired on higher salaries.

This thwarted implementation of wide-ranging labour reforms to penalise companies for hiring more foreigners than locals.

 

 

 



Add to:

Add Comment
Please make sure the following errors to complete the comment
  • Please write a comment first
  • Sorry.. You cannot use HTML code here
  • Sorry.. you have exceeds the maximum charcter limit
Disclaimer: To use comment service please Login To add your picture and your name to your comments and the appearance of comment in less time
guest
guest
guest
(guest@site.com)
Select Mood Normal Cry Happy Nice Shcoked

Number of characters allowed no more than 1000 Letter

Adding a comments means you have read and agreed onComments Posting ProtocolsAnd You bear the moral and legal responsibility for the publication of this comment on Gulf times portal.
Readers mood after comment
Comments /Number of comments (0)
Order Comments
الصفحة 1 من 0
رقم الصفحة اذهب

Report Abuse

Choose Abuse Reason
  • advertising
  • Not related to subject
  • Offensive
  • Wrong Words
Send
Gulf Times SERVICES
Weather
Prayer times
Newsletter
Currency conversion
Embassy Services

* RequiredFields

Sender Name*
Sender E-mail*
Receiver Name*
Receiver E-mail*
Message